Animal Instincts
This is a combination of images and information summarising our research of Animal Instincts...
Animal Instincts
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tenevg:

#gorillas #monkey #baby
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3weeksmaximum:

Bwindi Impenetrable Rainforest, Uganda
3weeksmaximum:

Bwindi Impenetrable Rainforest, Uganda
3weeksmaximum:

Bwindi Impenetrable Rainforest, Uganda
3weeksmaximum:

Bwindi Impenetrable Rainforest, Uganda
3weeksmaximum:

Bwindi Impenetrable Rainforest, Uganda
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ourclassyphotos:

A somewhat loving moment between the baboons at the Adelaide Zoo.
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anth-receptor:

Excerpt from “The Cultures of Chimpanzees”Andrew Whiten and Christophe Boesch 

Scientists have been investigating chimpanzee culture for several decades, but too often their studies contained a crucial flaw. Most attempts to document cultural diversity among chimpanzees have relied solely on officially published accounts of the behaviors recorded at each research site. But this approach probably overlooks a good deal of cultural variation for three reasons. 
First, scientists typically don’t publish an extensive list of all the activities they do not see at a particular location. Yet this is exactly what we need to know—which behaviors were and were not observed at each site. Second,many reports describe chimpanzee behaviors without saying how common they are; without this information,we can’t determine whether a particular action was a once-in-a-lifetime aberration or a routine event that should be considered part of the animals’ culture. Finally, researchers’descriptions of potentially significant chimpanzee behaviors frequently lack sufficient detail, making it difficult for scientists working at other spots to record the presence or absence of the activities.
To remedy these problems, the two of us decided to take a new approach.We asked field researchers at each site for a list of all the behaviors they suspected were local traditions.With this information in hand,we pulled together a comprehensive list of 65 candidates for cultural behaviors.
Then we distributed our list to the team leaders at each site. In consultation with their colleagues, they classified each behavior in terms of its occurrence or absence in the chimpanzee community studied. The key categories were customary behavior (occurs in most or all of the able-bodied members of at least one age or sex class, such as all adult males), habitual (less common than customary but occurs repeatedly in several individuals), present (seen at the site but not habitual), absent (never seen), and unknown.
Our inquiry concentrated on seven sites with chimpanzees habituated to human onlookers; all told, the study compiled a total of more than 150 years of chimpanzee observation.The behavior patterns we were particularly interested in, of course, were those absent in at least one community,yet habitual or customary in at least one other; this was our criterion for denoting any behavior a cultural variant. (Certain behaviors are absent for specific local reasons, however, and we excluded them from consideration. For example, although chimpanzees at Bossou scoop tasty algae from pools of water with a stick, chimpanzees elsewhere don’t do this,simply because algae are not present.) 
The extensive survey turned up no fewer than 39 chimpanzee patterns of behavior that should be labeled as cultural variations, including numerous forms of tool use, grooming techniques and courtship gambits, several of which are illustrated throughout this article.This cultural richness is far in excess of anything known for any other species of animal. —A.W.and C.B.
anth-receptor:

Excerpt from “The Cultures of Chimpanzees”Andrew Whiten and Christophe Boesch 

Scientists have been investigating chimpanzee culture for several decades, but too often their studies contained a crucial flaw. Most attempts to document cultural diversity among chimpanzees have relied solely on officially published accounts of the behaviors recorded at each research site. But this approach probably overlooks a good deal of cultural variation for three reasons. 
First, scientists typically don’t publish an extensive list of all the activities they do not see at a particular location. Yet this is exactly what we need to know—which behaviors were and were not observed at each site. Second,many reports describe chimpanzee behaviors without saying how common they are; without this information,we can’t determine whether a particular action was a once-in-a-lifetime aberration or a routine event that should be considered part of the animals’ culture. Finally, researchers’descriptions of potentially significant chimpanzee behaviors frequently lack sufficient detail, making it difficult for scientists working at other spots to record the presence or absence of the activities.
To remedy these problems, the two of us decided to take a new approach.We asked field researchers at each site for a list of all the behaviors they suspected were local traditions.With this information in hand,we pulled together a comprehensive list of 65 candidates for cultural behaviors.
Then we distributed our list to the team leaders at each site. In consultation with their colleagues, they classified each behavior in terms of its occurrence or absence in the chimpanzee community studied. The key categories were customary behavior (occurs in most or all of the able-bodied members of at least one age or sex class, such as all adult males), habitual (less common than customary but occurs repeatedly in several individuals), present (seen at the site but not habitual), absent (never seen), and unknown.
Our inquiry concentrated on seven sites with chimpanzees habituated to human onlookers; all told, the study compiled a total of more than 150 years of chimpanzee observation.The behavior patterns we were particularly interested in, of course, were those absent in at least one community,yet habitual or customary in at least one other; this was our criterion for denoting any behavior a cultural variant. (Certain behaviors are absent for specific local reasons, however, and we excluded them from consideration. For example, although chimpanzees at Bossou scoop tasty algae from pools of water with a stick, chimpanzees elsewhere don’t do this,simply because algae are not present.) 
The extensive survey turned up no fewer than 39 chimpanzee patterns of behavior that should be labeled as cultural variations, including numerous forms of tool use, grooming techniques and courtship gambits, several of which are illustrated throughout this article.This cultural richness is far in excess of anything known for any other species of animal. —A.W.and C.B.
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Conchetta the cotton-top tamarin monkey looks after her twins at Alma Park Zoo in Brisbane, Australia
Picture: Adam Smith/Newspix / Rex Features
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A baby mountain gorilla hitching a lift with its mother in the Bwindi impenetrable forest, Uganda. 
Picture: Kelvin Lack
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A baby monkey heads out to explore the jungle - but is yanked back by its protective mother. The pigtail macaque was constantly grabbed back by its hind leg as it played near Pariaman, in West Sumatra, Indonesia.
Picture: Siljori Images / Barcroft India
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allcreatures:

Kahuzi-Biega National Park in Congo
Picture: Molly Feltner/Gorilla Doctors/Barcroft Media (via Gorilla Doctors: saving endangered mountain gorillas in Africa - Telegraph)
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allcreatures:

Picture: Adrian Tavano/Solent News & Photo Agency (via Pictures of the day: 28 November 2012 - Telegraph)
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funnywildlife:

White-Naped Mangabeys at ZSL London Zoo by Sophie L. Miller on Flickr.#Cute#Nature#Photo
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funnywildlife:

Remember Koko!! A gorilla’s ‘motherly instinct’ !!Koko the gorilla has loved cuddling and nurturing kittens since 1984. Gorilla Foundation volunteer Janis Turner arranged to have a litter of orphaned kittens visit Koko in September 2009, and Koko became especially enamored with a tiny orange kitten named Tigger, pictured here. “Something fascinated her about Tigger,” Turner told PeoplePets.com. “Koko purrs. I get chills just thinking about it. She does this deep purr and she’s so gentle and has this loving looking in her eye. … Kittens are so calm around Koko because she has that motherly instinct.” Read more about Koko at PeoplePets.com.via Ron Cohn / The Gorilla Foundation / koko.org
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Primates teach us about society
A Swiss primatologist who arrived at The University of Western Australia in April to work in the School of Anatomy, Physiology and Human Biology probably won’t mind too much if his students start ‘monkeying around’ occasionally in class.
Assistant Professor Cyril Grueter is used to it, having spent almost two years in Yunnan - a remote mountainous region of China - studying a group of 400 black and white snub-nosed monkeys.
The monkeys - never seen outside China - live in similar social groups to humans and Assistant Professor Grueter observed them in their wild state to investigate the evolutionary pathways that lead to our multilevel societies.  His study was recently published in the International Journal of Primatology.
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funnywildlife:

Zoo-apeing
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littleglobes:

Primatology Lesson of the Day #36: 2 Cute 4 Me
I dare you to deny the cuteness of these baby primates. Can’t do it, can you? That’s because we are programmed to find certain things cute and baby primates fit the bill: big head, big eyes, little noses, a waddle to their walk, and chubby bellies. None of these things sound particularly cute, I mean that’s now how you’d describe your dream boy/girl, but these exact traits have been used to make everything from snakes to spiders cute in cartoons.
It works because humans are programmed to find babies cute, evolution’s way of making sure our ancestors didn’t get bored with their children as infancy and childhood grew longer and longer. The attraction is so powerful now that it can even carry over to other species. I’ve heard my sister and many others say when looking at a kitten, “I wish there was a way to keep them like this forever.”
At the same time, not every baby is cute. If inbreeding had occurred or a severe mutation of some sort, the baby might not be as attractive to the parents, so cuteness is also an indicator of good genes and health, harsh as that sounds.
littleglobes:

Primatology Lesson of the Day #36: 2 Cute 4 Me
I dare you to deny the cuteness of these baby primates. Can’t do it, can you? That’s because we are programmed to find certain things cute and baby primates fit the bill: big head, big eyes, little noses, a waddle to their walk, and chubby bellies. None of these things sound particularly cute, I mean that’s now how you’d describe your dream boy/girl, but these exact traits have been used to make everything from snakes to spiders cute in cartoons.
It works because humans are programmed to find babies cute, evolution’s way of making sure our ancestors didn’t get bored with their children as infancy and childhood grew longer and longer. The attraction is so powerful now that it can even carry over to other species. I’ve heard my sister and many others say when looking at a kitten, “I wish there was a way to keep them like this forever.”
At the same time, not every baby is cute. If inbreeding had occurred or a severe mutation of some sort, the baby might not be as attractive to the parents, so cuteness is also an indicator of good genes and health, harsh as that sounds.
littleglobes:

Primatology Lesson of the Day #36: 2 Cute 4 Me
I dare you to deny the cuteness of these baby primates. Can’t do it, can you? That’s because we are programmed to find certain things cute and baby primates fit the bill: big head, big eyes, little noses, a waddle to their walk, and chubby bellies. None of these things sound particularly cute, I mean that’s now how you’d describe your dream boy/girl, but these exact traits have been used to make everything from snakes to spiders cute in cartoons.
It works because humans are programmed to find babies cute, evolution’s way of making sure our ancestors didn’t get bored with their children as infancy and childhood grew longer and longer. The attraction is so powerful now that it can even carry over to other species. I’ve heard my sister and many others say when looking at a kitten, “I wish there was a way to keep them like this forever.”
At the same time, not every baby is cute. If inbreeding had occurred or a severe mutation of some sort, the baby might not be as attractive to the parents, so cuteness is also an indicator of good genes and health, harsh as that sounds.